Category: Supreme

SUPREME BLUE ROSE

In January 2013, Erik Larsen’s brilliant but all-too-brief run on Rob Liefeld’s SUPREME came to an end with #68. Larsen left with the title with several dangling plot-threads, and I was curious to see whom Liefeld would enlist to follow-up on them. Tom Scioli publicly stated that he’d be pitching Rob Liefeld for the gig,…

SUPREME #68 by Erik Larsen

As I said in my reviews of the first 40 issues of SUPREME, the biggest problem the book suffered from was a lack of a consistent creative team to guide it. The book went through multiple writers and artist during this run, until Alan Moore took over, but he rewrote the old character. So I…

SUPREME #67 by Erik Larsen

The previous issue ended with the surprising appearance of Omni-Man. I assume this was done as a sort of wink towards Alan Moore’s run on this title. In Moore’s run, SUPREME was a comic-book artist in his secret identity, drawing the adventures of a fictional superhero called Omniman for Dazzle Comics. In one issue, Omniman…

SUPREME #66 by Erik Larsen

As I stated in the last issue, the timeline of these events, and when they are supposed to be taking place, is a little out of wack. It starts to be addressed here somewhat, as we see Ethan and Diana walking the street, where Ethan realizes that the latest revision must have occurred around them.…

SUPREME #65 by Erik Larsen

Picking right up from the previous issue we open with the last remaining survivors of The Supremacy: Sister Supreme (the Black woman), “Original Supreme” (from 1920), 50’s Supreme (who, for some reason, is still stuck with a Lion’s head), Squeak The Supremouse, and Alan Moore’s Supreme (hereafter to be referred to as Ethan Crane) .…

SUPREME #64 by Erik Larsen

I’m just going to start off with this here, because I don’t want to have to post this image in all my reviews. So be forewarned now, if you haven’t read Erik Larsen’s run on Supreme, just go ahead and do so now, because I’m going to be spoiling the frack out of it in…

SUPREME #63 by Alan Moore and Erik Larsen

When Awesome Comics closed shop in early 2000, one of the greatest tragedies was that it left Alan Moore’s Supreme incomplete. Although the final issue that saw print, SUPREME: THE RETURN #6, was satisfying enough, there were still some open plot threads in the series, specifically whatever Darius Dax was up to, which were still…

SUPREME SACRIFICE #1

This issue was released in September 2006 via Rob Liefeld’s latest imprint (co-founded with Jimmy Jay), Arcade Comics. This was meant to be the kickoff of a new storyline featuring Supreme, apparently in an attempt to reconcile and/or merge the original Supreme with the Alan Moore version of Supreme. It featured two stories, and was…

Brigade #1 (featuring KID SUPREME)

This issue was published in July 2000 by Rob Liefeld’s Awesome Comics. Written by Larry Stucker and drawn by Deitrich Smith, this is a new incarnation of the team, not connected to the original series. The story revolves around S.P.I.C.E. an artificially intelligent robot (built to look and act like a teenager girl) was programmed…

SUPREME by Alan Moore

Alan Moore, a man considered by many (including myself) to be The Greatest Comic-Book Writer Of All Time, was hired by Rob Liefeld to take over the SUPREME series, beginning with issue #41. That’s quite a coup for this series. As I’ve said in my previous reviews of this series, one of the biggest drawbacks…

KID SUPREME

Even before the Lady Supreme series there was this spin-off solo series of Kid Supreme, with Dan Fraga on art and plot, and Eric Stephenson on the script. I wrote before about the events of Supreme #36 where Kid Supreme fought a racist female supervillain named LATINA, which resulted in the death an innocent bystander,…

LADY SUPREME

Before I get to the Alan Moore run of Supreme, here is a little side project that Extreme Studios launched, originally published by Image Comics. At the conclusion of Supreme #40, Lady Supreme decided to remain on that other Earth in deep space, while Supreme returned home, so this title was a spin-off to show…

SUPREME #0, #32-40

Along with variant covers and swimsuit editions, a new trend in the comic-book industry that picked up in the 1990’s was “zero issues”. Publishers would release issues of certain series as #0, usually to be part of some special storyline or tell a significant story. In August 1995 Rob Liefeld’s Extreme Studios line at Image…

SUPREME in BRIGADE #17-21

Brigade began as a spin-off title of Rob Liefeld’s Youngblood, featuring new original superheroes of his. In February 1995 there was a radical revamp of the series, launching in the aftermath of Liefeld’s EXTREME SACRIFICE crossover, with issue #17. Now it would be a team made up of not just some of Liefeld’s characters, but…

SUPREME #24-31

At some point in recent issues it must have been decided that the original concept of SUPREME just wasn’t working. I’m unable to find sales charts for the month of November 1992, when SUPREME #1 came out, but I’m willing to bet that like most of the early Image titles, and particular those published by…

SUPREME #19-23

This next batch of issues that I’m reviewing continues the revolving door of creative teams. Rob Liefeld is credited with “story” on issues #20, 22–23, with Kurt Hathaway scripting #19–21, and then Gary Carlson takes over as scripter for #22-23. Artists on the ensuing issues include Marat Mychaels, Cedric Nocon, Joe Bennett, and Mark Pajarillo.…

Keith Giffen’s SUPREME

Writer/artist Keith Giffen joined Image Comics in 1993, with his creator-owned series TRENCHER, which, according to Wikipedia featured “a zombie-like anti-hero named Gideon Trencher, as he endeavors to complete his mission of exterminating souls that had been “wrongfully reincarnated”. It’s Gideon’s job to hunt down these beings, with the assistance of a voice in his…

SUPREME MADNESS

SUPREME MADNESS is a 6-part story, the first full Supreme-centric crossover, which ran from SUPREME #13-18 and firmly established Supreme within the broader Image Comics Universe at the time, as opposed to simply just Rob Liefeld’s Extreme Studios corner of Image. This arc benefited from a coherent, if simple, storyline. Rob Liefeld is credited with…

Supreme: Glory Days

Written by Rob Liefeld, Robert Napton, Karl Altsaetter Drawn by David Williams Inked by Gary Martin Published by Image Comics This two-issue miniseries debuted in October 1994 It co-stars GLORY, who is Rob Liefeld’s analog of Wonder Woman. The first issue opens in Berlin in 1945, the last days of World War II, with a…